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Geylang Singaporean Cambodia

September 18, 2013

To get the most out of the modern fusion Singaporean dishes on offer at Geylang House, be prepared to get messy — real messy. With crab, prawns, fish head and frogs dominating the extensive and exotic menu, there is no escaping tucking into generous portions of by-the-kilogram seafood dishes with nature’s cutlery, so to speak.

The menu’s stand-out dish is the Singapore special chilli crab (seasonally priced at about $2.50 per 100 grams), consisting of a whole crab basted in a chilli and egg recipe exclusive to the restaurant and made with imported Singaporean spices. It’s hard work for little meat, and be prepared to get up to your elbows in sauce and crab shell splatter, but it proves a delicious dish.

The salted egg crab (seasonally priced) is one of
the few non-spicy dishes on offer. The custard-like sauce
is a sugary reprieve from the chilli-dominated menu. But again, be ready to launch into the plate with both hands to garner any flesh.

Other seafood specialties include the unusual cereal prawn. Fried king prawns are placed atop a bed of crunchy oats and covered in sugary pork floss and baked Asian curry leaves. Like most items on the menu, it’s an ideal dish to share.

Claypot dishes also reign at Geylang House. The dried chilli frog is currently the restaurant’s most popular claypot dish ($7 for small, $10 for large). Made up of frog meat baked in thick, sweet soy sauce with shallots, this dish is also tricky to navigate with chopsticks, spoon or fingers, but the meat is tender and the sauce flavoursome. It comes with a side of rice congee.

A breakfast menu with a more Malaysian influence is also available. Bak kut teh ($6 for small, $9 for large) is a traditional Malay-Singaporean dish made with whole cuts of boned pork and Chinese herbs in a sweet and spicy clear broth.

The venue is ideal for groups, with an air-conditioned upstairs area and a large alfresco beer-garden style dining area downstairs. There are also plenty of large tables. Seafood is ordered by weight, so it would serve customers well to enjoy the Singaporean delights with a large group. As most of the seafood — crabs, prawns and fish — is served at market price, check the going rate before ordering to avoid any surprises at the end of the meal.

This article was first published in Asialife Magazine.

Photography by Chatti Phal.

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